How To Protect Your Building Site

As precisely as ever, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) goes into some detail about the ways in which the public must be protected from activities on a construction site. Sadly, there is less guidance on how to protect your site from that section of the public who think anything left out in the open is fair game for theft, vandalism or arson. So let’s take a look at this topic in the round – what you need to do to protect others and what you can do to protect yourself and your site.

Ensuring Your Site Can’t Harm The Public

First, your duties to others. Of course, the normal protocols for worker health and safety will apply And there are duties here for both the contractor and the client.
The project’s client has to provide the contractor with information about the land adjoining the site, how access to the site is managed, what the boundaries are and what measures are already in place to prevent unauthorised access. The contractor then has to decide if any extra measures need to be added. As the HSE sees it, there are three main issues: site access, preventing any hazards harming the public and taking special measures to protect the vulnerable.

As you might expect, that “vulnerable” group includes children, who are fascinated by building sites and “diggers”. Better fencing and management have led to a fall in the number of children injured on building sites, but there are still unfortunate accidents. And you may not know that the elderly and people with disabilities are also considered vulnerable, so, for example, if you set up an alternative route for pedestrians, these groups need to be able to use it.

Vehicle Movements, Trenches and Falling Tools

One of the main hazards to the public is vehicle movements. If you are working on a site that has plant and vehicles moving on roads or paths which the public also uses, you need to be doubly careful. The hazard of the public falling into trenches and pits is usually dealt with by barriers and temporary coverings overnight. The HSE recommends small mesh fencing or hoarding to a height of two metres, and hoarding will also help to deter theft, as thieves can’t see what is being kept on site.

Falling Tools or Materials

Nothing must fall outside the site boundary, so scaffolding may need netting, brick guards, toe boards or even covered walkways. Materials should be stored away from the site perimeter and stacked so they can’t topple over. Hazardous items need to be locked away when the site isn’t manned. When scaffolding is going up, extra precautions should be in place.

Theft, Arson and Damage

The good news is that some of the measures you put in place to comply with health and safety requirements actually help site security. Many thefts from sites take place during the day – construction workers’ personal property and tools can be targeted as well as vehicles and equipment. When … Read More

Sell Your Residence FEE

selling a homeThe promoting course of is a mix of research, solid reasoning and customary sense. There are two main ways of selling a residential property, by private treaty and by public sale. Sellers who put a property available on the market in winter ought to make sure that the home’s interior is nicely-lighted. Here’s the truth for homebuyers within the winter: You might have fewer choices, as inventory ranges drop significantly from November to February, but you will have extra leverage.

The selling course of is usually a lengthy, arduous one, and it is best to really feel empowered to talk up with out worrying about placing your relationship on the road. For those who plan on promoting any time soon, it’s essential to factor these and other costs into the equation.

When you traded your $500,000 property for one valued at $450,000 plus $50,000 in cash, you would owe taxes for that 12 months on the $50,000. Promoting privately is often simply as tense as a public auction, and you may be confronted with necessary decisions if you end up introduced with presents that are lower than your asking worth.

The federal allowance for a way a lot profit you will get with out paying capital features tax is pretty high — $250,000 for singles and $500,000 for couples. This is added to the full revenue of the proprietor and taxed in accordance with the slab fee applicable to him.… Read More

Buying plastering tools should not be hard

Buying plastering tools shouldn’t be difficult. There’s a huge range of tools available and, because plastering is a low-tech trade, they’re not as expensive as buying power tools. However, whether you’re buying plastering tools for DIY or as you set up as an independent tradesman, here are some useful tips to buying the tools that are right for you.

Less Is More

Don’t be tempted to buy an all-in-one kit, as this may contain tools that you never, or rarely, use. When buying plastering tools, it’s better to focus on buying a few key pieces of the best quality you can afford and add speciality trowels into the mix later as you need them.

What’s Your Skill Level?

This will determine the kinds of tools you need and your budget for them. If you’re a keen DIYer, then you won’t need the biggest and the brightest plastering tools available. You’ll need a mid-size plastering trowel of decent quality for occasional use. If you’re a skilled DIYer or professional, then you’ll know that the best trowels are pre-honed and therefore more expensive. You’ll also have a much clearer idea of the size of trowel you’ll need.

What Do You Need to Get the Job Done?

A plastering professional will have a basic kit of a plastering trowel, hawk and bucket trowel, and these essential pieces of kit will help a DIYer get any basic job done. But will you need a cornering trowel to make a neat job of those angles? Are there other specialist trowels you must have to get the job done, and how often will you use them? How frequently you’ll use a tool will help to decide whether you need a durable top-of-the-range tool or something more generic that gets the job done.

Do You Need to Buy the Best?

Again, the answer will depend on your skill level and the project you’re undertaking. The more skilled you are, the more you’ll be willing to invest in your plastering tools. If you’re a professional, then you’ll already have a preferred brand and know what works well for you, and when and where to invest your budget. You need to determine which price range of tools is right for your project and your ongoing needs.

Ask for Recommendations

Don’t be afraid to ask around. Generally, when someone finds a really good tool, they’re happy to share that information. Of course, what works for one person may not work for you, so always ask to test out a new piece of equipment if possible. Another good source of information can be online reviews, especially video reviews where you can see a trowel being used. If a certain brand keeps being mentioned positively over and over, it’s a safe bet that they produce plastering tools that are worth investing in.

Buy from a Reputable Retailer

Yes, you can pop to the local DIY superstore and pick up your plastering tools, but you may find the range isn’t extensive or that … Read More